113th United States Congress

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113th United States Congress
112th ←
→ 114th
Capitol at Dusk 2.jpg
U.S. Capitol building at dusk as seen from the eastern side (November 2014)
January 3, 2013 – January 3, 2015
Senate PresidentJoe Biden (D)
Senate President pro temPatrick Leahy (D)
House SpeakerJohn Boehner (R)
Members100 senators
435 members of the House
6 non-voting delegates
Senate MajorityDemocratic
House MajorityRepublican
Sessions
1st: January 3, 2013 – December 26, 2013
2nd: January 3, 2014 – December 16, 2014

The One Hundred Thirteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, from January 3, 2013, to January 3, 2015, during the fifth and sixth years of Barack Obama's presidency. It was composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives based on the results of the 2012 Senate elections and the 2012 House elections. The seats in the House were apportioned based on the 2010 United States Census. It first met in Washington, D.C. on January 3, 2013, and it ended on January 3, 2015. Senators elected to regular terms in 2008 were in the last two years of those terms during this Congress.

The Senate had a Democratic majority, while the House had a Republican majority. Widespread public dissatisfaction with the institution increased over its second year.[1][2][3][4] According to a Gallup Poll released in August 2014, the 113th Congress had the highest disapproval rating of any Congress since 1974, when data first started being collected: 83% of Americans surveyed said that they disapproved of the job Congress was doing, while only 13% said that they approved.[5][6] As of 2018, this is the most recent Congress in which Democrats controlled the United States Senate; the Republicans regained control of the Senate in the 2014 Senate elections and retained control during the 2016 Senate elections and 2018 Senate elections.

Major events

A government shutdown notice posted on October 1, 2013, with the Statue of Liberty in the far background[7]

Major legislation

Enacted

Proposed

Appropriations bills

Fiscal year 2014

Fiscal year 2014 runs from October 1, 2013, to September 30, 2014.[15]

  • Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2014 (H.R. 2216) - proposed
  • Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2014 (H.R. 2217) - proposed
  • Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2014 (H.R. 2609) - proposed

Fiscal year 2015

Fiscal year 2015 runs from October 1, 2014, to September 20, 2015.[15]

  • Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4800) - considered in the House on June 11, 2014.[16] The bill would appropriate $20.9 billion.[17]
  • Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4660) - passed the House on May 30, 2014.[18] The total amount of money appropriated in the bill was $51.2 billion, approximately $400 million less than fiscal year 2014.[19]
  • Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2015 - considered in the House on June 18, 2014. The bill would provide funding of approximately $491 billion.[20]
  • Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4923; 113th Congress) (H.R. 4923) - The bill would appropriate $34 billion to the United States Department of Energy, the United States Army Corps of Engineers, and related agencies.[21]
  • Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4487) - passed in the House on May 1, 2014.[22] The bill would appropriate $3.3 billion to the legislative branch for FY 2015.[23]
  • Military Construction and Veterans Affairs and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4486) - passed the House on April 30, 2014.[24] The total amount appropriated by the introduced version of the bill is $71.5 billion.[23]
  • Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 (H.R. 4745 or "THUD") - passed the House on June 10, 2014.[25] The bill would appropriate $17 billion to the Department of Transportation and $40.3 billion to the Department of Housing and Urban Development.[26]

Party summary

Resignations and new members are discussed in the "Changes in membership" section, below.

Senate

Final Senate Membership
     53 Democrats      45 Republicans
     2 Independents, caucusing with Democrats
Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
TotalVacant
DemocraticIndependentRepublican
End of previous Congress512471000
Begin532451000
June 3, 201352991
June 6, 2013461000
October 31, 20135345
February 6, 201452991
February 9, 2014531000
Final voting share55%45%
Beginning of the next Congress442541000

House of Representatives

Final House Membership
     201 Democrats      234 Republicans
Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
TotalVacant
DemocraticRepublican
End of previous Congress1912404314
Begin2002334332
January 22, 20132324323
April 9, 20132014332
May 7, 20132334341
June 4, 20132344350
July 15, 20132004341
August 2, 20132334332
September 26, 20132324323
October 18, 20132314314
November 16, 20132324323
December 10, 20132014332
December 17, 20132334341
January 6, 20142004332
January 27, 20142324323
February 18, 20141994314
March 11, 20142334323
June 24, 20142344332
August 18, 20142334323
November 4, 20142012344350
Final voting share46.2%53.8%
Non-voting members6060
Beginning of the next Congress1882474350

Leadership

Section contents: Senate: Majority (D), Minority (R)House: Majority (R), Minority (D)

Senate

Senate President
Senate President pro tempore

Majority (Democratic) leadership

Minority (Republican) leadership

House of Representatives

Speaker of the House
John Boehner
John Boehner (R)
(until October 29, 2015)

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

Members

Senate

Senators are listed by state, and the numbers refer to their Senate classes, In this Congress, Class 2 meant their term ended with this Congress, requiring re-election in 2014; Class 3 meant their term began in the last Congress, requiring re-election in 2016; and Class 1 meant their term began in this Congress, requiring re-election in 2018.

House of Representatives

Changes in membership

Senate

State
(class)
VacatorReason for changeSuccessorDate of successor's
formal installation
Massachusetts
(2)
John Kerry
(D)
Resigned February 1, 2013, to become U.S. Secretary of State.[28][29]
Successor was appointed February 1, 2013, to continue the term.
Mo Cowan
(D)
February 1, 2013
New Jersey
(2)
Frank Lautenberg
(D)
Died June 3, 2013.
Successor was appointed June 6, 2013, to continue the term.
Jeffrey Chiesa (R)June 10, 2013
Massachusetts
(2)
Mo Cowan
(D)
Appointment expired July 16, 2013, following a special election.[30]
Successor was elected June 25, 2013, to finish the term ending with this Congress.
Ed Markey (D)July 16, 2013
New Jersey
(2)
Jeffrey Chiesa
(R)
Appointment expired October 31, 2013, following a special election.[31][32]
Successor was elected October 16, 2013, to finish the term ending with this Congress.
Cory Booker (D)October 31, 2013[32]
Montana
(2)
Max Baucus
(D)
Resigned February 6, 2014, to become U.S. Ambassador to China.
Successor was appointed February 9, 2014, to finish the term ending with this Congress.
John Walsh (D)February 11, 2014

House of Representatives

DistrictVacatorReason for changeSuccessorDate of successor's
formal installation
Illinois 2ndVacantJesse Jackson Jr. (D) resigned November 21, 2012, near the end of the previous Congress for health reasons.[33]
A special election was held April 9, 2013.
Robin Kelly (D)April 11, 2013[34]
South Carolina 1stVacantTim Scott (R) resigned January 2, 2013, near the end of the previous Congress, when appointed to the Senate.[35]
A special election was held May 7, 2013.
Mark Sanford (R)May 15, 2013[36]
Missouri 8thJo Ann Emerson
(R)
Resigned January 22, 2013, to become president and CEO of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.[37]
A special election was held June 4, 2013.
Jason Smith (R)[38]June 5, 2013[39]
Massachusetts 5thEd Markey
(D)
Resigned July 16, 2013, having been elected to the United States Senate in a special election.
A special election was held December 10, 2013.
Katherine Clark (D)[40]December 12, 2013
Alabama 1stJo Bonner
(R)
Resigned August 2, 2013, to become a vice chancellor in the University of Alabama System.
A special election was held December 17, 2013.
Bradley Byrne
(R)
January 7, 2014
Louisiana 5thRodney Alexander
(R)
Resigned September 26, 2013, to become the secretary of the Louisiana Department of Veterans Affairs.
A special election was held November 16, 2013.[41]
Vance McAllister (R)November 21, 2013[42]
Florida 13thBill Young
(R)
Died October 18, 2013.
A special election was held March 11, 2014.
David Jolly (R)March 13, 2014[43]
North Carolina 12thMel Watt (D)Resigned January 6, 2014, to become head of the Federal Housing Finance Agency.
A special election was held November 4, 2014.
Alma Adams (D)November 12, 2014
Florida 19thTrey Radel (R)Resigned January 27, 2014 following a conviction for cocaine possession.[44]
A special election was held June 24, 2014.
Curt Clawson (R)June 25, 2014
New Jersey 1stRob Andrews
(D)
Resigned February 18, 2014, to take a position at a Philadelphia law firm.[45]
A special election was held November 4, 2014.
Donald Norcross
(D)
November 12, 2014
Virginia 7thEric Cantor
(R)
Resigned August 18, 2014 following his primary defeat.
A special election was held November 4, 2014.
Dave Brat
(R)
November 12, 2014

Committees

[Section contents: Senate, House, Joint ]Listed alphabetically by chamber, including Chairperson and Ranking Member.

Senate

House of Representatives

Sources: H.Res. 6, H.Res. 7

Joint committees

Caucuses

Employees

Legislative branch agency directors

Senate

House of Representatives

  • Chaplain: Patrick J. Conroy
  • Chief Administrative Officer: Ed Cassidy (until December 31), Will Plaster (starting January 1)
  • Clerk: Karen L. Haas
  • Inspector General:
  • Parliamentarian: Thomas J. Wickham Jr.
  • Sergeant at Arms: Paul D. Irving

See also

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